Explore human cultures

What we will do next:

Explore human cultures

Cambridge is where the best human minds gather to study humanity itself. Its art, its culture, its philosophies, its religions, the language and societies it creates, and destroys. By studying the arts and humanities, and sharing what we see, we bring a powerful new perspective to human challenges—from immigration to trade, from the rise of populism to increased inequality. Through human ingenuity, we will explore, examine and enrich human life.

Cambridge is where the best human minds gather to study humanity itself. Its art, its culture, its philosophies, its religions, the language and societies it creates, and destroys. By studying the arts and humanities, and sharing what we see, we bring a powerful new perspective to human challenges—from immigration to trade, from the rise of populism to increased inequality. Through human ingenuity, we will explore, examine and enrich human life.

Featured priorities

Conservators Rebecca Goldie, Mary French, and Emma Nichols examine a Lewis-Gibson fragment
Home to many of the world’s most significant collections, Cambridge is driving efforts to appreciate, understand and conserve many more beyond its borders.
A Cambridge-Africa Programme workshop in Tanzania
Supporting a new generation of outstanding researchers to create an African research culture.
Nepali woman with crops
Increasing crop yields and improving nutrition to feed a growing population.
Writing Arabic on a board during a talk
Language is fundamental to humanity's ability to thrive.

Impact of giving

 
 
 
 
 
Rothiemurchus Forest
Cambridge Conservation Initiative (CCI) unveiled a programme to restore priority landscapes across Europe
 
 
 
 
 
Philomathia Africa Programme gift agreement signing in Trinity Hall on 4 February 2018. Image by Stephen Bond Photography
A programme launched jointly by the University, Trinity Hall and the Philomathia Foundation will create new research and teaching collaborations with African universities, scholars and students in the social sciences to help seek solutions to some of the world’s most intractable challenges.
 
 
 
 
 
Cambridge University Botanic Garden
The legacy from Monica Beck (widow of the late Professor Bill Beck) reflects her life-long relationship with, and affection for, the Fitzwilliam Museum and Cambridge University Botanic Garden.
 
 
 
 
 
An architects' drawing of the new Education Wing
Fifty years on from becoming a University of Cambridge Museum, Kettle’s Yard has stayed true to its founder’s vision while attracting 70,000 visitors a year.