Millennium Mathematics Project - STIMULUS programme

Millennium Mathematics Project - STIMULUS programme

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  • A STIMULUS helper in school

STIMULUS places Cambridge student volunteers in maths and science classes.

STIMULUS is a peer-assisted learning programme, involving Cambridge University students from a wide range of disciplines. Students of subjects such as: mathematics, engineering, physics, medicine, computer science, biology, zoology, natural sciences and law help with maths, science and ICT classes in primary and secondary schools around the city of Cambridge.

STIMULUS creates around 300 volunteer placements each year: each placement involves a student volunteer helping for one afternoon each week throughout a University term in their assigned school.

Read more about STIMULUS

Next steps

You can donate online now using our secure website. Alternatively, to discuss your philanthropic objectives, please contact me.

Glen Whitehead

Glen Whitehead

Senior Associate Director - Physical Sciences

glen.whitehead@admin.cam.ac.uk

+44 (0)1223 330112 or mobile: +44 (0)7711 500332

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