Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences

Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences

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The Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences is the oldest of the University of Cambridge museums, having been established in 1728. A walk through the museum takes you on a 4.5 billion year journey through time, from the meteoritic building blocks of planets to the thousands of fossils of animals and plants that illustrate the evolution of life in the oceans, on land and in the air.

We facilitate research and study and aim to stimulate learning and inspiration through our collections, which number more than two million fossils, minerals and rocks. 

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Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences website

Opportunities in 'Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences'

Drawers of rocks from the Terra Nova expedition, 1910–1913
The Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences is the oldest of the University of Cambridge museums, having been established in 1728. To improve the accessibility of its world-renowned igneous and metamorphic rock collection, the Museum proposes to build a new Geological Collections Store to adjoin the AG Brighton Building in which the Museum is located.

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Cambridge’s collections have multiple lives, embracing public and private histories, personal and scientific interest and the past and the present. They illuminate the wider activities, histories and environments of the people who made them and the worlds they represent. We draw upon our collections to conduct pioneering research. By investing in our collections and museums, our ambition is to deepen public understanding of cultures and peoples across the planet.
Department of Earth Sciences
As a large, integrated department the expertise and current research of our staff spans many areas of the earth sciences.
Cavendish Laboratory: physics of medicine
With its outstanding track record in research and teaching, the School of the Physical Sciences is home to some of the world's most important work in astronomy, chemistry, earth sciences, geography, materials science, physics, and pure and applied mathematics.